GN Symposium

Global Network for Japanese Language Education (GN) consists of 11 national or regional organizations of Japanese language education and studies in the world. One of GN’s main activities is to organize (International Conference of Japanese Language Education), in turn, every two years. Bali ICJLE 2016 is organized by the Association of Indonesian Japanese Language Education Studies, and GN also organizes the following two symposia during this conference. We hope that you will join us.

  1. Challenges and Responsibilities of Japanese Language Education in Secondary Schools around the World: Voices from Teachers Working on Human Development in the 21st Century
  2. Leading to the 21st-Century Japanese Language Education- Best Practices of Japanese Language Global Articulation Project (J-GAP)

 

Challenges and Responsibilities of Japanese Language Education in Secondary Schools around the World: Voices from Teachers Working on Human Development in the 21st Century

Date and Time: 13:00 – 15:00, Friday, September 9, 2016
Place: Bali Nusa Dua Convention Center (BNDCC)/Pacatu Hall
Organizer: The Society for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language (GN Japan)
Participants and Supporters: GN participating organizations of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, South Korea, and United States
Financial Support: The Shoyu Club and Toshiba International Foundation
Objectives:
In order to commemorate ICJLE 2016 in Indonesia, which has a large number of Japanese language students at secondary school level, we decided to organize this symposium to discuss secondary level Japanese language education in the world. We will especially focus on their teaching practice whose imminent goal is to impart the 21st-century knowledge, skills, and qualities to young students.

In this symposium, secondary school Japanese teachers from five countries will discuss lesson designs and problems and outcomes of their implementation in their effort to produce students who can live productively and effectively in the 21st century. We would like to share their teaching practices and efforts to achieve the 21st-century educational goals according to their different teaching philosophy, educational policy, etc.

We hope that this symposium will give impetus to teachers, administrators, and policy makers to start sharing information and working collaboratively to encourage more young students to study Japanese and improve the quality of secondary-level Japanese language education in the world. We invite teachers from higher education as well as secondary school teachers.

Contents:

  1. The Objectives of the Symposium and Introduction of the Panelists (5 minutes):
    Yoshiko Kubota (GN Japan, Project Leader)
  2. Video Presentation (5 minutes):
    What are people like, who can survive the 21st Century?
    ―Key Competencies and 21st-Century Skills and Each Country’s
    Curriculum Guidelines and Standards
  3. Presentations and Discussions by Each Country’s Secondary School Japanese Language Teachers (95 minutes):
    Six Teachers from Indonesia, United Sates, South Korea, Thailand, and Australia|

    1. Yosiharu Azama
      (Teacher, North Salinas High School, California, United States)
    2. Erwan Kasriyanto
      (Teacher, Ambarawa 1st Senior High School)
      (President, Association of Japanese Language Teachers in Central Java)
    3. Evi Lusiana
      (Senior Lecturer, Japan Foundation Jakarta Center)
    4. Kwak Youngsook
      (Teacher, Mokdong High School, Seoul, South Korea)
    5. Thirat Lomsri
      (Teacher, Lampang Kanlayanee School, Chiang Mai, Thailand)
    6. Sally Mizoshiri
      (Teacher, North Sydney Girls High School, Sydney, Australia)
      *Ten high school teachers from Indonesia will also join the discussion.
  4. Summary (5 minutes)
  5. Questions and Answers (10 minutes)

 

Leading to the 21st-Century Japanese Language Education – Best Practices of Japanese Language Global Articulation Project (J-GAP)

Date and Time: 15:30 – 17:30, Friday, September 9, 2016
Place: Bali Nusa Dua Convention Center (BNDCC)/Pacatu Hall
Organizer: American Association of Teachers of Japanese (AATJ) (USA)
Participants and Supporters: GN participating organizations of China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan
Financial Support: The Shoyu Club

Objectives:
J-GAP (Japanese Global Articulation Project) started in 2010 as the first research project of GN. Its goals are two-fold: to achieve articulation among K-16 Japanese language education in the world and to achieve articulation in Japanese language education for students going to Japan.

After five-year activities, the project is still under way in the United States (4 states), South Korea (Busan), Taiwan (throughout the country) to achieve the articulation of K-16 Japanese language education, and between Tianjin University of Foreign Studies (China) and Musashino University (Japan) to achieve the smooth articulation for students moving between these two universities by using the JF Japanese Language Education Standard and developing students’ profiles of those students.

This symposium purports to share the best practices of achieving articulation and connection among Japanese language classes, programs, and institutions through J-GAP activities. We hope that this symposium will provide the participants with opportunities to learn from J-GAP activities and gain ideas to carry out their own activities to achieve articulation in their home institution and country.

Contents:

  1. The Objective of the Symposium (10 minutes): Y.-H. Tohsaku (GN J-GAP Project Leader)
  2. Best Practices of Achieving Articulation (20 minutes each): Four representatives from    J-GAP USA, South Korea, Taiwan, and      Japan-China Project―
    1. Y.-H. Tohsaku (Professor, University of California, San Diego) – J-GAP Activities in the United States
    2. Gi-Young Jung (Professor, Busan University of Foreign Studies) – J-GAP Activities in South Korea
    3. Shuchuan Chen (Professor, Soochow University) – J-GAP Activities in Taiwan
    4. Keiko Horii (Professor, Musashino University) – J-GAP Activities in Japan and China
  3.  Discussion (15 minutes)
  4. Summary (5 minutes)
  5. Questions and Answers (10 minutes)